Corridor

 

MASTER OF DESIGN INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIO 2017

URBAN NOISE WALL SOUND PARK

ross mcleod + jordan lacey + lawrence harvey

 

Living with noise is a daily activity for those living along motorways. To date, the primary noise attenuation methods include passive sound barriers. These are partially effective in removing motorway noise, but there is still some residual noise that pours over the top creating mundane sonic conditions.

The Noise Wall Sound Park studio asked students to engage with a high-profile industry grant between RMIT University and Transurban that investigated an innovative approach to motorway noise management. In the project motorway noise was viewed as a condition that could be both cancelled, using physical engineering methods, and could be transformed, using more ephemeral and creative design methods.

Eleven students from the RMIT Master of Design Innovation and Technology took part in a design studio that researched ways in which physical and electroacoustic noise transformation methodologies could be applied as an urban design solution to parklands adjacent to motorway noise walls. Students were given the unique opportunity to engage with a group of acoustic researchers during which they could hear approaches to noise transformations in-situ and liaise directly with the researchers.

Ultimately the students were asked to design a fully landscaped motorway parkland that embedded electroacoustic infrastructure into a noise wall. The primary intention of the designs was to encourage local residents to utilise the parklands as spaces of play, recreation and imagination. During the design sessions three motorway noise wall parkland typologies were recognised: the corridor, the wedge and the field.

 

Wedge

 

Field